December 3, 2022

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Mary Ella Simmons: A Life Worth Celebrating

Mary Ella Simmons was born on September 18, 1897. This year is the 100th anniversary of her birth, and it’s time to celebrate this woman who fought for women’s rights and for the recognition of African American artists. What made her so remarkable? She was a pioneer in music history. Her work helped pave the way for modern jazz musicians like Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington. She also worked tirelessly alongside other influential African American artists like Paul Robeson and W.E.B. Du Bois to change laws in America that restricted black people from performing in public spaces and having access to more mainstream media outlets.

Mary Ella Simmons immigrated with her family from Barbados when she was just two years old. After living in Harlem, they moved to Philadelphia where she studied at the Institute for Colored Youth before taking up journalism as a career decades later at age 27. Mary Ella Simmons died in 1955 but is still an inspiration for all women today

A Life Worth Celebrating

Mary Ella Simmons is a woman who changed the course of African American music history. She was an outspoken advocate for women’s rights and help paved the way for more modern jazz musicians like Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington to come into existence.

Background Information on Mary Ella Simmons

Born in Barbados

Studied at the Institute for Colored Youth before taking up journalism at age 27

Died in 1955 but is still an inspiration for all women today

Why is she a feminist icon?

Mary Ella Simmons is a feminist icon because she helped create jazz music and was an influential artist in the movement for women’s rights.

She also made her mark on American society by changing laws that restricted black people from performing in public spaces and having access to more mainstream media outlets.

She fought for African American woman’s rights and recognition throughout her career

Mary Ella Simmons was a pioneer in music history. She helped pave the way for modern jazz musicians like Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington. She also worked tirelessly alongside other influential African American artists like Paul Robeson and W.E.B Du Bois to change laws in America that had restricted black people from performing in public spaces and having access to more mainstream media outlets throughout her career.

For African Americans, the fight for their rights has been long, but it’s finally starting to pay off today with new legislation, including the advancement of sexual assault law on college campuses.

Important quotes from Mary Ella Simmons

“I’m a black woman who loves music and wants to be free to make it.”

-Mary Ella Simmons

“The ability to produce what I want is my passport. And there’s nothing that can stop me from getting where I’m going.”

-Mary Ella Simmons